04 7 / 2012

Where did all you lovely followers come from? :3

Well either way, thank you for liking this little blog of mine, enough to follow it! At first, I had intended for this to be a space where I stored away all of the crafts, projects, and inspirational photos that I had book-marked, so I wouldn’t be spamming everyone on my personal blog. 

But now that I have followers, I would love for this blog to be more interactive! As in, what would you all like to see? More crafts? More household DIY? More guides? More recipes? Whatever you like, just let me know, and I’d be happy to factor it in! 

Have a good night, fellow DIY-ers!

<3 Homemaking Monster

05 2 / 2012

05 2 / 2012

05 2 / 2012

{1} MATERIALS:

• Metal or Wooden Ring • Scissors • Cotton or Nylon Rope

   {2} Measure out 8- 6 ft long pieces of rope, but cut them longer if you’re planning a long drop.

{3} Tie a simple knot with all 8 pieces just below the ring.

{4} Measure down about 8 inches and tie two adjacent pieces of rope together.

Do this all around so you have four knots at the same level.

{5} Take the rope below two of the knots and tie one piece of one to a piece of another about 4 inches down. Do the same with the rope below the next knotted section, until you have eight knots all at the same level.

{6} Gather all 8 pieces together about 4 inches down and tie them all up in a big knot. Trim the rope ends with your scissors, and if you’re using polyprop rope, give each end a lick with a flame to seal it.

{FINISH} Slip your pot into the holder, resting the base on the big knot at the bottom.

via (this amazing tutorial on MoreDesignPlease)

05 2 / 2012

DIY Bottle Centerpieces


via (MoreDesignPlease.com)

05 2 / 2012


Homemade Wood Stain
It is a good idea to make your own wood stains when you embark on furniture refinishing projects. Commercial stains contain synthetic pesticides, including fungicides, that can cause environmental problems and health risks. A rule of thumb for buying stains is that the darker the stain, the fewer pesticides, since the pigment provides more protection from ultraviolet light. Clear sealants exposed to the sun won’t last long, so more chemicals are added.
Natural pigments are made from minerals (from earth and clay, called iron oxides) and vegetables (roots, bark, leaves, and fruit such as alkanet root, beets, walnuts, purple cabbage, coffee and tea, indigo, and madder root). Natural pigments make exquisite, mellow colors.

To make your own plant dye/stains:
Simmer a handful of plantmatter in 4 cups of water for an hour, adding more water as it evaporates.
Cool, strain, and add 1/2 teaspoon of alum (available in the spice section of supermarkets) as a fixative.
Paint on, dry, and recoat two to four more timesor as desired.
*You can make your own earth pigment in the old way, by finding interesting colored dirt and washing it well.Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/homemade-wood-stain.html#ixzz1lUV4OZLU

Homemade Wood Stain

It is a good idea to make your own wood stains when you embark on furniture refinishing projects. Commercial stains contain synthetic pesticides, including fungicides, that can cause environmental problems and health risks. A rule of thumb for buying stains is that the darker the stain, the fewer pesticides, since the pigment provides more protection from ultraviolet light. Clear sealants exposed to the sun won’t last long, so more chemicals are added.

Natural pigments are made from minerals (from earth and clay, called iron oxides) and vegetables (roots, bark, leaves, and fruit such as alkanet root, beets, walnuts, purple cabbage, coffee and tea, indigo, and madder root). Natural pigments make exquisite, mellow colors.


To make your own plant dye/stains:


  • Simmer a handful of plant
    matter in 4 cups of water for an hour, adding more water as it evaporates.
  • Cool, strain, and add 1/2 teaspoon of alum (available in the spice section of supermarkets) as a fixative.
  • Paint on, dry, and recoat two to four more times
    or as desired.


*You can make your own earth pigment in the old way, by finding interesting colored dirt and washing it well.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/homemade-wood-stain.html#ixzz1lUV4OZLU


05 2 / 2012


What you need:
Krylon Outdoor Spaces- Satin Bark
Krylon Outdoor Spaces- Satin Khaki
Krylon Outdoor Spaces- Earth
Krylon Easy-tack Repositionable Adhesive
Concrete garden pavers
Pattern Stencils, General Supplies
Newspaper or drop cloth
Painter&#8217;s tape
How and How long:
Set up a spray area by covering a table or other work surface with newspaper or a drop cloth in a well-ventilated area. If using old or used pavers, clean well before painting, making sure they are free of dirt.
Paint pavers with Outdoor Spaces Satin Khaki and let dry.
Determine the stencil pattern you want. Use painters tape and mask off outside edges of pavers and any areas that you don’t want painted.
 Tape down your stencil to keep it from moving and then paint with Krylon Outdoor Spaces Earth.
To create an aged worn look, now paint the outside edges of pattern with Outdoor Spaces Satin Bark.
Remove stencil and let dry.
Repeat steps 1 through 5 for any additional patterns or details you would like on your paver.
Approximate Project Time: 2 Hours
What it Costs:
Approximate cost is $24

What you need:

  • Krylon Outdoor Spaces- Satin Bark
  • Krylon Outdoor Spaces- Satin Khaki
  • Krylon Outdoor Spaces- Earth
  • Krylon Easy-tack Repositionable Adhesive
  • Concrete garden pavers
  • Pattern Stencils, General Supplies
  • Newspaper or drop cloth
  • Painter’s tape

How and How long:

  1. Set up a spray area by covering a table or other work surface with newspaper or a drop cloth in a well-ventilated area. If using old or used pavers, clean well before painting, making sure they are free of dirt.
  2. Paint pavers with Outdoor Spaces Satin Khaki and let dry.
  3. Determine the stencil pattern you want. Use painters tape and mask off outside edges of pavers and any areas that you don’t want painted.
  4.  Tape down your stencil to keep it from moving and then paint with Krylon Outdoor Spaces Earth.
  5. To create an aged worn look, now paint the outside edges of pattern with Outdoor Spaces Satin Bark.
  6. Remove stencil and let dry.
  7. Repeat steps 1 through 5 for any additional patterns or details you would like on your paver.

Approximate Project Time: 2 Hours

What it Costs:

Approximate cost is $24

(Source: )

05 2 / 2012

"Take a hot glue gun and print your design on a bottle, and then spray paint."
via Rose Murray

"Take a hot glue gun and print your design on a bottle, and then spray paint."

via Rose Murray

05 2 / 2012

cityofroses91:

I craft, therefore I am (without fingerprints)

cityofroses91:

I craft, therefore I am (without fingerprints)

(via thedelphicbees)